2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale
2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale__after

Description

Product Description

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit. The classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother''s womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef. She shares special points of her favorite preparations with listeners throughout the story.

From Publishers Weekly

Each chapter of screenwriter Esquivel''s utterly charming interpretation of life in turn-of-the-century Mexico begins with a recipe--not surprisingly, since so much of the action of this exquisite first novel (a bestseller in Mexico) centers around the kitchen, the heart and soul of a traditional Mexican family. The youngest daughter of a well-born rancher, Tita has always known her destiny: to remain single and care for her aging mother. When she falls in love, her mother quickly scotches the liaison and tyrannically dictates that Tita''s sister Rosaura must marry the luckless suitor, Pedro, in her place. But Tita has one weapon left--her cooking. Esquivel mischievously appropriates the techniques of magical realism to make Tita''s contact with food sensual, instinctual and often explosive. Forced to make the cake for her sister''s wedding, Tita pours her emotions into the task; each guest who samples a piece bursts into tears. Esquivel does a splendid job of describing the frustration, love and hope expressed through the most domestic and feminine of arts, family cooking, suggesting by implication the limited options available to Mexican women of this period. Tita''s unrequited love for Pedro survives the Mexican Revolution the births of Rosaura and Pedro''s children, even a proposal of marriage from an eligible doctor. In a poignant conclusion, Tita manages to break the bonds of tradition, if not for herself, then for future generations.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Take one part Whitney Otto''s How To Make an American Quilt (McKay, 1991), add a smidgen of magical realism a la Garcia Marquez, follow up with several quixotic characters, garnish with love, and you''ll have Like Water for Chocolate , a thoroughly enjoyable and quirky first novel by Mexican screenwriter Esquivel. Main character Tita is the youngest of three daughters born to Mama Elena, virago extraordinaire and owner of the de la Garza ranch. Tita falls in love with Pedro, but Mama Elena will not allow them to marry, since family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter remain at home to care for her mother. Instead, Mama Elena orchestrates the marriage of Pedro and her eldest daughter Rosaura and forces Tita to prepare the wedding dinner. What ensues is a poignant, funny story of love, life, and food which proves that all three are entwined and interdependent. Recommended for most collections.
- Peggie Partello, Keene State Coll., N.H.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

A first novel (``the number one bestseller in Mexico in 1990'''')--liberally sprinkled with recipes and homemade remedies- -from screenwriter Esquivel. Set in turn-of-the-century Mexico, it tells the romantic tale of Tita De La Garza, the youngest of Mama Elena''s three daughters, whose fate, dictated by family tradition, is to remain single so that she can take care of her mother in her old age. Tita has grown up under the tutelage of the spinster cook Nacha and has learned all the family recipes and remedies. When Pedro, Tita''s admirer, asks for Tita''s hand in marriage, her mother refuses permission, offering instead Tita''s older sister, Rosaura. Pedro accepts, thinking it will be a way to stay close to his one true love. But Tita doesn''t know his thinking and, crushed by what she sees as betrayal, she must make the wedding cake. Crying as she bakes, her tears mingle with the ingredients and unleash a wave of longing in everyone who eats a piece. It is just the beginning of the realization that Tita has special talents, both in the kitchen and beyond. As we witness the nurturing Tita''s struggle to be true both to family tradition and to her own heart, we are steeped in elaborate recipes for dishes such as turkey mole with almonds and sesame seeds or quail with rose petals, in medicinal concoctions for ailments such as bad breath and gas, and in instructions on how to make ink or matches. Eventually, Tita must choose between marrying a loving, devoted doctor or saving herself for Pedro, her first true love. Her choice is revealed in a surprise last chapter. Playful in its flirtation with magical realism and engaging in its folkloric earthiness but, nonetheless, light, romantic fare. -- Copyright ©1992, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Review

“A tall-tale, fairy-tale, soap-opera romance, Mexican cookbook and home-remedy handbook all rolled into one, Like Water For Chocolate is one tasty entree from first-time novelist Laura Esquivel.”— San Francisco Chronicle

From the Publisher

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit. The classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother''s womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef. She shares special points of her favorite preparations with listeners throughout the story.

"A tall-tale, fairy-tale, soap-opera romance, Mexican cookbook and home-remedy handbook all rolled into one, Like Water For Chocolate is one tasty entree from first-time novelist Laura Esquivel." -- San Francisco Chronicle

From the Inside Flap

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit. The classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother''s womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef. She shares special points of her favorite preparations with listeners throughout the story.

About the Author

Laura Esquivel is the award-winning author of Like Water for Chocolate, which has sold over four and a half million copies around the world in 35 languages, The Law of Love, and most recently, Between Two Fires. She lives in Mexico City.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
2,259 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Amber Meinzer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Withdrawals a range of emotions in the reader and teaches us all about the importance of love
Reviewed in the United States on February 12, 2018
Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquirel is a novel chalk-full of rich and beautiful metaphors and figurative language, magical realism and best of all FOOD! The emotion that has been poured into writing this piece is clearly evident and has created a meaningful,... See more
Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquirel is a novel chalk-full of rich and beautiful metaphors and figurative language, magical realism and best of all FOOD! The emotion that has been poured into writing this piece is clearly evident and has created a meaningful, emotional and heartfelt journey for every reader. Watch as Tita discovers herself, learns life lessons and most importantly about passionate love.
Again, the book is centered around cooking, which is personified throughout the book and is spoken with an air of such love, passion and pride… it becomes something more than just cooking. Cooking is a vector of emotion in this book, the aroma’s, the sounds, the smells, the feelings etc. all reflect Tita’s emotions and thoughts. To reflect this further, a motif is used throughout the book: hot and cold are used constantly to compare good and bad. Mama Elena is almost always described to be frigid, chilling and cold. Whenever Tita is upset or during periods of depression; she is described to have a chronic chilling feeling in her bones. John is described to be warm, symbolizing that he truly loves her and respects her. There is another symbol related to this which will become a prevalent point towards the end of the book. Over and over again, a tiny flame is used to describe internal peace, love and passion. This is what cures Tita of the unbearable coldness. The fire is lit by people that love you and lift you up. To bring the motif of temperature and flame full circle, in cooking heat is often applied to cook something. Before the help of the flame, food is raw and inedible. With the heat, the food is turned into an emotional work of art.
It takes Tita almost the entirety of the novel to find her true self and to understand love and passion. The book is named “Like Water for Chocolate”, because it is describing boiling water. Boiling water is on the brink of boiling over, but it hasn’t and doesn’t boil over. Instead, there is turmoil inside the pot, but nothing on the outside. This is a beautiful and well-thought-out​ metaphor expressing that Tita wants so badly to stand up to her mother, but her whole life, her mother never acted as a mother to her. Tita spent so much of her life trying to get her mother''s approval, even if she didn’t know it fully.
Like Water for Chocolate is a beautiful book, it is a book that withdrawals emotion within us just as it does in the book. This book will make you smile and then make you angry and then make you cry, with tears of love and sadness. It is not an easy read, emotionally… probably because the message of this book resonates so deeply within us.
35 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
ATXMomma
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I read this book in a matter of hours
Reviewed in the United States on September 25, 2019
I found this book captivating from the start, and finished it in less than a day. I just couldn''t be pulled form its pages. The cultural lore and imagery used in this story''s telling was as powerful and captivating as it was fantastical. As wild as the descriptions... See more
I found this book captivating from the start, and finished it in less than a day. I just couldn''t be pulled form its pages. The cultural lore and imagery used in this story''s telling was as powerful and captivating as it was fantastical. As wild as the descriptions could be, they were also profoundly true as a metaphor for the potential of human reactions in the secret and safe chambers of our minds- where our emotions take place without restraint; pure and unfiltered.
12 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jennifer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you like mystical realism this might be a book you’d want to check out
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2019
Like Water for Chocolate takes place during the Mexican revolution, and is the story of the De La Garza family. Their story is told through recipes and home remedies, and the book is broken out into twelve chapters; each chapter is one month of the year. However, the story... See more
Like Water for Chocolate takes place during the Mexican revolution, and is the story of the De La Garza family. Their story is told through recipes and home remedies, and the book is broken out into twelve chapters; each chapter is one month of the year. However, the story takes place over a twenty-year period.

I liked some of the themes in the book: finding a sense of purpose in one’s life, the things we give importance to that maybe aren’t so important, and what love really is.

If you like mystical realism this might be a book you’d want to check out.
14 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kiiks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thoroughly entertaining story; brought me to love Magical Realism
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2017
My book club read this book Mexico as we "read our way around the world." We were not disappointed! This was my first introduction to magical realism, and I was in love from the first page. Don''t expect the characters or story to be extremely developed. This is one... See more
My book club read this book Mexico as we "read our way around the world." We were not disappointed! This was my first introduction to magical realism, and I was in love from the first page. Don''t expect the characters or story to be extremely developed. This is one of those books that you might find yourself speeding through and then wildly contemplating once it''s over. While the story isn''t pointedly about Mexican history or culture, we learned about those aspects in perfect little doses through the writing style and story line. My group was interested and entertained. I enjoyed the book so much that I bought myself a copy after I read the library''s copy.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Alexandra P.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Like Water For Chocolate Review
Reviewed in the United States on February 17, 2020
Like Water for Chocolate is a romantic tragedy that takes place during the Mexican Revolution, at the turn of the 20th century. It was written by Laura Esquivel in 1989 and has won the ABBY award, which is given annually by the American Booksellers Association. The novel... See more
Like Water for Chocolate is a romantic tragedy that takes place during the Mexican Revolution, at the turn of the 20th century. It was written by Laura Esquivel in 1989 and has won the ABBY award, which is given annually by the American Booksellers Association. The novel has been translated into over thirty languages and has been printed into over three million copies.
The author uses a very broad and sophisticated vocabulary and uses a lot of figurative language in her writing. The book also contains several delicious Mexican food recipes that go well with the overall theme of each chapter. Each chapter of the book is categorized into a month of the year, causing the book to take place over a span of many years. “Like Water for Chocolate” has a very dark message to it, and I feel that it is geared towards a more mature audience than myself.
This novel stars 3 daughters and their controlling mother, Mama Elena. The youngest daughter, Tita, experiences heartbreak and deep sadness when her mother forces her lover, Pedro, to marry Tita’s sister, Rosaura, rather than Tita.Tita is told that it is her job to take care of her mother, and that she must remain single for the rest of her life. Tita and Pedro long for each other, and continue to pursue eachother even after his marriage to Tita’s sister. When a tragic event strikes, Tita becomes overwhelmed with sadness and goes into a state of depression. She leaves the ranch and tries to reconnect with herself through the help of an indigenous woman and a doctor that she is staying with, named John. Tita finds her passion for cooking and begins to heal. After hearing of life changing news at the ranch, Tita decides to go back and do what is right for herself. The novel ends with hundreds of plot twists and never answered questions.
The author ensures that the reader connects with the characters of this book by incorporating strong emotions that create a heartfelt adventure for each and every reader. I would say that “Like Water for Chocolate” was definitely a hard read. The constant sadness that is expressed by each character caused me to be overcome with emotion, but at the same time I often found myself getting a bit bored while reading. The plot was a little repetitive, and I was a little bit disappointed with the ending. Another criticism that I have of the novel is that I feel like the characters were not described in enough depth. Throughout the whole book, the characters'' appearance seemed to be a mystery. This made it harder for me to imagine what they looked like, but at the same time allowed me to fully focus on their personality traits.
Something that I enjoyed about this novel was how the author personified Tita’s cooking and incorporated emotion into the food that she made. The recipes symbolize the different tones of the story, and reflect Tita’s mood and emotions. Esquivel uses Tita’s knowledge and experience in the kitchen and applies it to her ability to communicate her emotions. The author conveys love, pain, lust, and many other emotions through cooking and arouses an intense sexual desire in several of the characters through the food in which Tita makes. Overall, I would rate this novel 3/5 stars, and would love to read it again once I feel that I have matured a little bit more. “Like Water for Chocolate’ deeply explores the themes of love and lust and teaches the reader about the traditional lifestyle of Mexico in the early 1900s.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A.V.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Take this book up with a large dose of culture, and then it will make sense
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2019
I read this in high school too and ended up loving it, but I will question the purpose of having it read at an age younger than 18. It''s a mature albeit highly impractical tapestry about love that most teens won''t fully grasp the meaning of, until they''re older. A... See more
I read this in high school too and ended up loving it, but I will question the purpose of having it read at an age younger than 18. It''s a mature albeit highly impractical tapestry about love that most teens won''t fully grasp the meaning of, until they''re older. A picturesque, magical, and nearly tall-tale-like adventure of a romance story. Since high school, the movie adaptation is also one of my very few favorite romance movies to boot.

I was so disappointed to see such dismissive reviews on GoodReads. You must have a general understanding of the traditionalistic and Catholicized culture and societal expectations in Mexico as is portrayed in this story. Only then will Tita and Pedro''s ephemeral bursts of passion and Mama Elena''s anger-inducing tyranny make sense to the reader. And as far as the "overwrought" descriptions of cooking go, if you consider them infused with the indigenous beliefs and healing stories of generations of Mexican families...then this term of "magical realism" will also make sense.

*Spoiler*

.

.

.

.

That being said, in realistic terms, it was better for John and Tita to be together. John was a good man, and Pedro''s behavior could be considered cowardly and questionable for all those years. But still, always think of their dilemma within the constraints of Mama Elena''s values. Even after her death, men are supposedly not permitted to bypass the laws laid by the parents, even if he and his love are grown adults. Must be married. No divorce or extramarital affairs. Everything judged under God''s eyes. No premarital sex. Children can be beholden to take care of their parents for the rest of their lives, with no future of their own until the parents die. You ONLY have children so you automatically have your own personal caretaker when you''re old. (Yes. It is that messed up, and several cultures around the world still practice this extreme strictness today, particularly many Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Latino communities.)

However, in terms of the convoluted part of culture that Tita HAD to overcome in order to "free" herself and her future generations, the actual ending was necessary.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Molly
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Review about literary techniques and devices
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2019
Like Water for chocolate is a marvelous book, so glad I got to read it for my tenth grade Latin America project in English this six weeks. I will be focusing on the novels literary techniques and devices that shape the theme of the story. I will not be focusing on my... See more
Like Water for chocolate is a marvelous book, so glad I got to read it for my tenth grade Latin America project in English this six weeks. I will be focusing on the novels literary techniques and devices that shape the theme of the story. I will not be focusing on my opinion of the story or the plot, solely talking about the devices listed above. The book has 245 pages of complete chaos and drama filled life’s story. The novel has a very unique set up, there is a recipe on every chapter, so they reader can feel connected if they were to bake or cook along side of the characters. The recipes symbolize the different tones of the story, let’s talk about the chapter right before Rosaura was getting married to the love of Tita’s life, the recipe that was featured in that chapter was a wedding cake, so you can see how they incorporate the recipes into the book quite well. The title of the book is a metaphor that correlates with the main character Tita, it means that one’s emotions are on the verge of boiling over, because Tita is having a rough patch in her life because her sister is getting married to the man she loves most. The author is very good at engaging the readers in with the romance but half the time we don’t know where we are or how we got there, the book very well sets the stage for the romance and we now know about every little detail there is to know but I think the author needs to use some of those details towards the setting of the story so the reader can follow along more easily. The characters are hispanic and that is about all we know, for all we know Tita could be the ugliest person alive, it’s all about perspective. The story doesn’t give specific details about the person so that the reader can judge the character based on their opinion of the book, but not all of us like not knowing what someone looks like, so I believe the author should have taken that into consideration when writing the book, I feel like us as readers could have related more if we knew more about the characters. Other than all the criticism the book is quite fantastic, it will make you want to drop everything you are doing and read, page after page. Definitely give this book a try if you love a romantic story, and or, amazing mexican recipes that you can make in your very own home. Thanks for listening and make sure to check out Like Water for Chocolate from a store near you!
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Stephanie Launiu
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It has become one of my all-time favorites
Reviewed in the United States on August 22, 2019
I bought this book months ago and looked at it every day until finally picking it up, and within 2 days I had read it cover to cover. I loved it and was entranced by the genre of magical realism. Laura Esquivel is a genius writer, and although I knew I was reading a novel... See more
I bought this book months ago and looked at it every day until finally picking it up, and within 2 days I had read it cover to cover. I loved it and was entranced by the genre of magical realism. Laura Esquivel is a genius writer, and although I knew I was reading a novel that couldn''t possibly have happened the way it was written, Esquivel brought her characters to life. Tita, Gertrudis, Rosaura, Mama Elena, Pedro, Nacha, Chencha...their movie danced across my brain as I read their fantastic story. I''m pretty sure that the next time I cut into an onion and the tears start, I will think of Tita.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Bruce Wilson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Magical realism and passionate woman
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 5, 2019
This is a well crafted novel, all the more so for the way it combines magical realism, narrative and dialogue. Just like a recipe. ''Crafted'' is perhaps the wrong word. There is too much emotion, imagery, involved narrative. It is more like music. The control of tempo is...See more
This is a well crafted novel, all the more so for the way it combines magical realism, narrative and dialogue. Just like a recipe. ''Crafted'' is perhaps the wrong word. There is too much emotion, imagery, involved narrative. It is more like music. The control of tempo is excellent. To start with I thought the recipies inserted into the text were unnecessary. They are not. They are there to slow the pace. At the beginning of a chapter they are like a prelude, and woven into the story, often as part of the magical realism. A magical potion. But it works the other way too. Passions are a drug and food can be a an antidote. There is much more to praise. It deserved literary prizes (published 1989). It is enthralling reading. Just read it.
One person found this helpful
Report
Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Strange yet beautiful
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 4, 2019
I had been recommended this book for a long time by a friend and finally got around to reading it over Christmas. There was much to love; a compelling storyline, the fascination of Mexican culture and folklore, and the never-ending alchemy of the many recipes featured. But...See more
I had been recommended this book for a long time by a friend and finally got around to reading it over Christmas. There was much to love; a compelling storyline, the fascination of Mexican culture and folklore, and the never-ending alchemy of the many recipes featured. But at times the feminist in me just wanted to shake certain characters, and whilst I''m certainly no stranger to magical realism, having grown up on the ley lines of Glastonbury, some of the scenarios we encounter as readers are more than a little far fetched! If you are after a completely different novel though, this is definitely it, and, despite my subjective niggles here and there, it is gorgeous and breathtakingly intoxicating.
One person found this helpful
Report
Danny Morris
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not my flavour
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 21, 2021
Quirky idea of wrapping a narrative around a set of recipes. But the narrative is boring, predictable and poorly written in my opinion. So many exclamation marks ! and most of the symbolism is spelled out to you instead of developing and existing in its own right. None of...See more
Quirky idea of wrapping a narrative around a set of recipes. But the narrative is boring, predictable and poorly written in my opinion. So many exclamation marks ! and most of the symbolism is spelled out to you instead of developing and existing in its own right. None of the characters were likable or memorable to me. And I get that this is a fairly ''domesticated'' novel with most of the action happening in and around the kitchen, but I felt that the Central/South American setting was wasted. Ideas of tradition are explored, and race and gender touched upon, the latter to a large degree. But I still don''t feel like this book really says anything. Which I guess is fine, because it boils down to a twee romance novel with a few fantastical magical happenings. If that''s your thing, you''ll Iove this - but it was not for me.
One person found this helpful
Report
S. Perry
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Charming but lacking magic
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 13, 2016
It''s a charming book that I''m glad I read. The characters are enjoyable and I like the tragic set up of Tita''s story...but as a fan of magic realism, it feels like magic realism lite...it touches on the techniques I know and love but doesn''t quite accomplish them. Sometimes...See more
It''s a charming book that I''m glad I read. The characters are enjoyable and I like the tragic set up of Tita''s story...but as a fan of magic realism, it feels like magic realism lite...it touches on the techniques I know and love but doesn''t quite accomplish them. Sometimes there is a lack of depth to some situations and characters, especially Pedro who she is in love with. As the book progresses, I don''t feel he is worthy of her devotion. It also only really touches on the political history that it is meant to run along side which is a shame. But the writing is rich and the recipes so vivid you can taste them.
5 people found this helpful
Report
Books R Best
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
RATHER STRANGE
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 23, 2020
I’m not sure what to make of this book, or even what genre it fits into. There are cooking recipes, not accurate enough to follow, supernatural appearances and passages of pure fantasy. The storyline is tenuous in places and I only finished it as it was prescribed reading...See more
I’m not sure what to make of this book, or even what genre it fits into. There are cooking recipes, not accurate enough to follow, supernatural appearances and passages of pure fantasy. The storyline is tenuous in places and I only finished it as it was prescribed reading for our book club.
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 16 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • fall recipes
  • novels in spanish

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale

2021 new arrival Like outlet online sale Water for lowest Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies outlet sale